Carl Davidson (29/02/2016, The Press) suggests interruption science explains the difficulties in getting things done. It’s a great article and well worth reading.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/opinion/77340595/Why-is-it-so-hard-to-get-anything-done

 

Join in The Conversations That Count Day – NZ 16 April 2016

It’s time to have the conversation you may have  put off for too long! Saturday 16 April 2016 is the national Conversations that Count Day – a time to think about advance care planning – for your future and your end of life care. It is the ideal time to think about yourself and your loved ones. Go for it. www.conversationsthatcount.org.nz

Introverts do make good leaders – great article in NZ Management mag, Dec 2015

I agree wholeheartedly with Douglas Lang’s comments in his Looking for fair and balanced (leadership) reporting article in the December 2015 edition of NZ Management magazine. The style of extroverted leaders is  widely extolled whereas the styles of introverted leaders hardly rates a mention. The limiting and inappropriate ‘this opposed to that’ style needs to be reconsidered, so that equal value is placed on the management and leadership styles of introverts and extroverts alike.  The article can be purchased online at: http://www.management.co.nz/issues/management-december-2015

 

New resource available for mid-life women

The Ripenists is a new resource targeted at smart, self-aware midlife women who want to make the second half of their life filled with zest and zing. It’s about positive, vibrant aging, and people reaching their full potential. It’s filled with interesting, engaging articles and reflections, all well worth reading and then going back for more . See www.theripenists.com for details.

 

What are the problems with ‘sticking like lint, to the familiar’? Management coach explains all

Mary Oliver once said “And now I understand something so frightening, and wonderful – how the mind clings to the road it knows, rushing through crossroads, sticking like lint to the familiar”. (izquotes.com). She’s captured in such a succinct way, how we effortlessly run on automatic pilot, repeatedly doing what we always do, without really thinking about it. Yet if we always do what we’ve always done, we will always get what we’ve always got. If we want to make changes in our working and personal worlds, we need to know our habits and patterns; know how they work for us or against us; and look beyond the familiar and the comfortable, to what might be possible, if we slowed down when faced with life’s crossroads, and allowed ourselves to consider alternative beliefs and different routes.

‘Willful blindness’ more common than we think, management coach suggests

In Jasbindar Singh’s October 2015 blog she highlights Margaret Heffernan’s latest book ‘Willful Blindness’. Margaret explores why individuals (all of us) tend to ignore the obvious, to our detriment; offers explanations why we may do it, and the difficulties inherent in seeing, then naming, what is going on in a situation most people want to avoid noticing. It is an excellent summary of her key points. Jasbindar’s blogs are always a mine of information – and well worth subscribing to.

Honest eyes and inconvenient facts a great notion, says management coach

This phrase was used recently by the All Blacks coach Steve Hansen. Hansen (The Press, Sept 11, 2015) suggested it was important to look at situations with honest eyes to see the inconvenient facts (the stuff we can’t deny, despite our wish to do so) that lie within them. Once we’ve faced the facts, we can then do something about the situation in question. What a great notion: it’s simple, elegant and very true.

Accountability in organisations – what % is required, management coach asks

John Izzo talks about a bank that operated on a 100% responsibility/ 0 excuses policy. The premise was that every employee, regardless of their role, were 100% responsible and accountable for doing the very best for their clients and the organisation itself. To hear the principles behind it, watch  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WdpvaMX1Gw

What barriers would get in the way of it working in every organisation?

Walk through your meeting, management coach suggests

Meeting rooms, air conditioning, uncomfortable chairs, harsh lighting and meetings that go on, and on, and on. The traditional way of having a meeting with a colleague or two may be harmful for our physical and mental health in so many ways. A healthy alternative is to have walking meetings: get out of the office, gather the colleagues together, select the issue that needs attention and walk and talk until the desired outcome is reached or you’ve come to your
favourite cafe. Once refreshed, continue walking and talking business until you are back at the office. There is something in the automatic rhythm of walking out in the fresh air that works wonders.