Accountability in organisations – what % is required, management coach asks

John Izzo talks about a bank that operated on a 100% responsibility/ 0 excuses policy. The premise was that every employee, regardless of their role, were 100% responsible and accountable for doing the very best for their clients and the organisation itself. To hear the principles behind it, watch  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WdpvaMX1Gw

What barriers would get in the way of it working in every organisation?

Walk through your meeting, management coach suggests

Meeting rooms, air conditioning, uncomfortable chairs, harsh lighting and meetings that go on, and on, and on. The traditional way of having a meeting with a colleague or two may be harmful for our physical and mental health in so many ways. A healthy alternative is to have walking meetings: get out of the office, gather the colleagues together, select the issue that needs attention and walk and talk until the desired outcome is reached or you’ve come to your
favourite cafe. Once refreshed, continue walking and talking business until you are back at the office. There is something in the automatic rhythm of walking out in the fresh air that works wonders.

In our loud world, how well do we listen?

Julian Treasure believes the world around us is getting louder and louder yet we aren’t listening. He offers 5 ways to listen better with this acronym RASA: receive, appreciate, summarise and ask questions. To hear his TEDTalk (7.46mins) go to

www.ted.com/talks/julian_treasure_5_ways_to_listen_better/transcript?

 

 

Dying to Know Day poster highlights one core statistic

Kerrie Noonan’s Groundswell project that promotes ‘death literacy’ has some amazing posters to highlight their Dying to Know Day on 8th August 2015. My favourite one cites one core statistic that many individuals in a death-denying culture may not be aware of, that is: ’10/10 people die. Are you ready? ‘.  Equally enlightening is the poster that says ‘Talk about death. It won’t kill you’. With that assurance, there’s every reason to get chatting about it now, no need to wait until the 8th.

Death literacy highlighted on 8 August 2015

Amazing work is being done in Australia to educate the public on death literacy, which concerns encouraging people to have conversations and community action around death, dying and bereavement. All of which are topics many people wish to avoid thinking about, let alone discuss! What’s your death literacy like? For inspiration, see www.dyingtoknowday.org

 

Longer life expectancy – good news for everyone?

A recent report from Statistics New Zealand found the life expectancy for men and women has increased for all ethnic groups: 83.2 years for females and 79.5 years for males. How do we prepare ourselves now, to have a rich and satisfying life as we get older? Juliet Batten’s book ‘Spirited Ageing’  (2013) addresses this and offers practical ideas and guidance to help.  See www.julietbatten.co.nz

 

Check out the 2015 Human Capital trends

Deloittes have recently published the 10 core human capital trends. See http://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/pages/human-capital/articles/introduction-human-capital-trends.html?id=us:2sm:3li:4dcom_share:5awa:6dcom:human_capital

I’m delighted in the trend towards the simplification of work and the new era of doing less better, rather than doing more with less. That will make a huge difference to everyone in the workplace.

Most of the population don’t have wills

Recent research released from Perpetual Guardian (www.stuff.co.nz; 02/05/15) reveal many individuals leave making their first will until late in life – approximately 60-69 years of age; amongst older people with wills, 13% made their first will between 18-29 years of age; and 24% did so between 30-59 years of age.

These are alarming figures, given the reality every individual will face at some point in time (their death); and the impact dying without a will has on the loved ones, families and business partners left behind. Lawyers know that ‘where there’s a will, there’s a relative'; they also know the considerable costs dying intestate (without a will) has on a deceased’s estate. Relatives left behind incur personal costs: the emotional impact, stress and work they have to do, to sort out the mess left behind. It can be so easily avoided with forethought and respect for others.