Margaret Morrell has spent 20 years providing reflective supervision training in the health and social services sector, and written 5 guides on the topic. Each guide book is comprehensive and easy to read and follow.  They’re a valuable resource for any supervisors and supervisees. Highly recommended. To find out more  visit www.margaretmorrell.com

 

 

 » Read more about: Reflective supervision for health and social services supervisors and supervisees  »

I’ve enjoyed participating in the World Business Executive Coaches pre-Summit (WBECS) webinars over recent weeks. WBECS offer the pre-Summit sessions free of charge, while their comprehensive Summit course is fee-paying. This  programme is comprehensive. It’s worth considering if you are a coach who wants exposure to thought-leaders and experts around the globe, and ideas and input from coach practitioners worldwide. See www.wbecs.com for details.

 » Read more about: WBECS a must-explore for all coaches  »

The International Coaching Week is a time to bring the public’s attention to the value of working with a trained, qualified professional coach.  The International Coach Federation (ICF) reflects the value of professional coach training, on going professional development and coaching qualifications, and the impact coaching has on individuals and organisations across the different sectors. The ICF currently has approximately 30,000 members in 140 countries. If you’re looking for a coach in your area, see: https://coachfederation.org

 » Read more about: This week is International Coaching Week  »

Reflections On The Dark Side was published in 1990 by Dr Robert Hogan.  In his article, he discusses the ‘bright side’ and ‘dark side’ of people’s performance. This is revealed when they pay attention to the normal rules of self-presentation, and when they’re not paying attention, or when they don’t care about creating a good impression. He notes the three features of reputation, and says smart players in the game of life take good care of their reputations.

 » Read more about: The light and dark side of ourselves – what do we reveal to others?  »

Telling stories is part of the human condition. It is how ideas and information is conveyed to others, and it is also how we interpret and rationalise events and situations in our personal and professional lives. In our stories, we may often present ourselves in the best possible light –  our ‘best selves’.   Yet before making a decision on issues and passing on information, a distinction must be made between the actual, neutral facts of a given situation,

 » Read more about: Actual facts and the stories we tell ourselves about a situation may differ, to our detriment and others  »

Julian Treasure’s talk on 5 Ways to Listen Better is a revelation. He suggests that while we spend 60% of our communication time listening, we retain only about 25% of what we hear. This percentage can be increased if we train ourselves to actively listen, by developing specific listening skills. He shares five simple exercises that we can all do to develop conscious listening techniques, and create greater understanding and meaning from the sounds we hear.

 » Read more about: We may have ears but do we actually listen to others? Not necessarily, says management coach  »

80% of what it takes to change our own behaviour is a function of our ability to self-regulate. Personal change is possible, and the key to it is to know the ‘triggers’ that set us off. If we can identify each specific trigger, we’re then able to develop specific strategies to ensure we deliver a regulated, neutral response. We are creatures of habit, so any deliberate change process takes mindfulness, a good understanding of ourselves,

 » Read more about: Behaviour change related to our ability to self-regulate – sounds easy, but is it?  »

Robert Waldiner shares three core findings in the longest study on happiness: good relationships keep us happier and healthier; the quality of the close relationships are critical (they buffer us from life’s lows, difficult times, etc); and good relationships protect not only our bodies, but also our brains. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KkKuTCFvzI    for a fascinating talk and explanation of the findings.

 

 

 

 

 » Read more about: What makes a good life? A 75 year old ongoing study reveals 3 core lessons  »

With the plethora of webinars, seminars, training programmes and workshops readily available, it’s easy to be caught up in the latest hot topic ‘must do’. Yet before committing to new seminars, programmes and workshops, it pays to revisit all the ones they have already attended, and see what they actually did with the information given (typically, course notes are filed away and immediately forgotten). The key to integrating new learning is to consciously diary time over a two-three month time span to put into practice what has been learnt. 

 » Read more about: Stop, look, revisit – before committing to seminars and workshops  »

The Resilience Institute Team suggest tactical calm is the doorway to impulse control. They say ‘humans are wired, tired and fired to be stupid’ and the old-school advice of ‘take a deep breath’ when we are trying to calm ourselves in difficult situations, is the worst thing we can ever do. Why? Go to https://resiliencei.com/resilience-news/ and read From Strategic to Tactical Calm.

 » Read more about: What may save us from ourselves? Human wiring, impulse control and tactical calm…  »